Grantees

Health Benefits of Low-Income Weatherization: Evidence for Action

Project Summary: 

The investigators are evaluating the health impacts of the Extreme Energy Makeover (EEM) program – designed to improve energy efficiency in low-income homes through weatherization. The researchers are assessing how improving dwelling quality impacts health as well as energy cost savings. They are also examining how the resulting energy cost savings affect household budgets and expenditures on health and well-being. This project will create a database of the characteristics, health impacts, and costs and savings of weatherization. The database and findings from the study will inform optimization of low-income energy efficiency and healthy housing programs, particularly in moderate and hot-humid climate zones.

Outcomes:
Methodology:

Natural experiment including three comparison groups. Differences of means tests are used to compare a set of homes receiving weatherization treatment to a set of homes waitlisted to receive treatment and a set of homes that received treatment one year before. Self-reported health surveys are administered prior to weatherization and again one year later.

Principal Investigators: 

Bruce Tonn, PhD

Grant Start Date: 
February, 2017
Award Amount & Duration: 

$190,130 and 36 months